is one of the millions of dogs adopted through Petfinder.

Homeward Trails Animal Rescue adopts pets to homes in Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland. Many of the dogs and puppies available for adoption are being cared for in foster homes in the DC area but many are still in rural animal shelters and can only be brought to the DC area once we have approved adoptive or foster homes for them. If you’re interested in adopting one of these animals, please review our and contact the volunteer whose email is listed on his or her page. Or attend a where you can meet a number of dogs at once and talk to Homeward Trails volunteers about adoption.

If you are adopting a dog, check out this primer so you can meet and understand your dog’s needs.

There are a million good reasons to consider adopting a dog during American Humane’s yearly “Adopt-a-Dog Month®” in October – in fact, it’s a lot more than that. Each year, an estimated 3-4 million animals waiting in shelters for someone to give them a safe, loving home never find a hero to adopt them and, tragically, are euthanized.

We adopt dogs out of state, but the following restrictions apply:

Here, you can find out more information about adopting Guiding Eyes for the Blind puppies and dogs. Consider adopting an older pit bull. With an adult dog, what you see is what you get. Their personality is already developed, and you'll be able to spot the characteristics you're looking for much more easily than with a puppy.

SUCCEEDING WITH YOUR ADOPTED DOG

Our twice-monthly adoption event with shelter dogs and many area rescue groups is a great place to search for a new best friend.

Held the first and third Sunday afternoon of the month at the shelter, from noon to 2 pm.

You don't need to wait for Mingle With Our Mutts to visit us, we're open seven days a week!

Next Mingle is Sunday, June 18.

Dogs are available for adoption for $49.


1. Making the Best of the First Week with Your Dog - Just like us, dogs need order and leadership, especially dogs for adoption that aren’t accustom to a daily routine. They seek structure, which you must provide. Your dog needs to know that you are the boss and that you have a set of house rules. This makes the transition from the shelter to your home easier, faster and more rewarding. Hold a family meeting to create rules about caring for the dog. Purchase your basic dog care items such as ID tags, a collar and a 6 foot leash, food and water bowls, food, dog toys, a crate and bedding, and basic grooming tools. Just before you bring your dog into the home, take him for a walk to tire him out a little. At first, limit your dog to one room or area. Most dogs instinctively like to den, and a crate makes the ideal place for your dog to sleep and get away from household hubbub, a crate is where a lot of dogs for adoption already have spent a lot of time so it will feel familiar. Plan a trip to the vet in order to make sure your dog is healthy and will not transmit any diseases to other local dogs. For more tips, and advice read the full post at our blog. 3. FAQ for Dog Veterinarian Visits - Taking your dog to the veterinarian should be your first priority. This is especially true if you have other pets. It's a good idea to make sure your new pet is healthy and doesn't have any diseases or viruses he or she could transmit to other dogs in the house. The best way to find a veterinarian is by word of mouth. The dog shelter or rescue group where you adopted your dog may have a good recommendation. For proper preventative care, your dog should be examined by a veterinarian twice a year. A typical vet checkup includes searching for fleas using a special flea comb. Taking your dog's temperature, and a physical examination which will include checking your dog's ears, eyes, nose, teeth, skin, legs, joints, and genitals, and lymph nodes and listen to the heart and lungs. It will be common for the veterinarian to stress the importance of avoiding parasites, and will suggest options for flea and tick prevention and control.