rescue dog collar large handmade

I started small, using the fabrics I had chosen specifically to compliment my dogs. But it didn't take long to branch out and my fabric stash soon exploded. Friends, then friends of friends, and even folks at the dog park began ordering custom sets for their best friends to wear. So when someone suggested I start a website it seemed like a natural progression. I needed a name for the site. After thinking about all my rescue dogs gave to me I decided on Rescue Me Collars & Fine Canine Apparel. The new leashes rescued my hands from the discomfort an ordinary leash could cause, but the real reason I chose the name was because Helen and Sammy rescued my heart. They are my inspiration everyday. And everything I make still has thoughts of them behind it.

Must order one of these!!! - Pet collar charms I Rescued my Human dog by ChubbyChicoCharms, $19.99

Instead of just watching sad animal rescue commercials featuring Sarah McLachlan, we decided to act. That’s why BioThane started a special program to give back to dogs in need. Rescue by BioThane is a special line of dog collars made specifically for furry friends in shelters across the Greater Cleveland area.

Rescue Organizations – Scout Dog Custom Collars

: The wider the collarthe less pressure it puts on certain points on your dogs neck. Have you adopted a pet? Or are you a shelter volunteer?
Help your shelter or rescue by recommending them for addition to the Dog Collar Boutique donation list.

HERO Dog - Collars and Leashes For Rescue and Shelter Dogs

A new study has found that the use of shock collars (also known as electronic collars or e-collars) can cause symptoms of distress in dogs, and the effects only worsen as the level of shock is increased.

Designer Dog Collars and Leads | Rescue Pet Supply


Of all the tools used in dog training, perhaps none is more widely misunderstood and maligned than the prong collar (also known as the pinch collar). Many well-meaning but misinformed people assume that judging by its looks, the prong collar is a barbaric device intended to "stab" a dog's neck in order to correct misbehavior. While walking my own dogs on this type of collar I have encountered complete strangers who think nothing of telling me how cruel I am to use such a harsh device. While I am indifferent to this type of comment, I worry that similar incidents will drive responsible dog owners away from using this excellent, effective and kind (yes, kind) training tool on dogs that benefit from it the most. This article is meant to reassure those who are already using the collar or are considering it and more importantly, to educate those who think it is "cruel" or unfair to the dog. The prong collar works on the concept that evenly applied pressure is gentler and more effective on a dog's neck than the quick jerk and impact of a choke chain or the steady, relentless pressure of a flat collar. While a professional trainer can make a choke chain correction look fast and flawless, it is very difficult for most pet dog owners to master the timing and the release of the correction. Also, even a perfectly executed choke chain correction is a repeated impact on a single spot on a dog's neck. The current trend of the "head halter" system is equally flawed. In an earlier edition of this article, I referred to it as a good choice for dogs with structural problems. In the past few years I have spoken with veterinarians, trainers and owners who took issue with that recommendation based on the potential insult to the soft tissue of the dog's upper neck and the often careless way in which the headcollar is used by people who are assured that it is "humane" and cannot harm their dog. Like every other training tool, it also has its place. However, for a breed already beset with potential spinal and structural problems such as the Doberman, I find myself recommending it less and less. The self-limiting tightening action of the prong collar also makes it a safer bet for strong-pulling dogs. A prong collar can only be pulled so tight, unlike the choke or slip collar, which has unlimited closing capacity and in careless or abusive hands, can cut a dog's air entirely.